70 "Elizabeth Barrett Browning" Quotes And Sayings

Elizabeth Barrett Browning was a poet, a painter, a translator and a dramatist. She was the first woman to be granted a civil list pension by the British government. She was also one of the most prolific poets in the English language, writing over 1,000 poems. Her poetry is considered to be one of the most important achievements in English literature, and her work continues to be widely read and studied.

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways....
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How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love thee to the depth and breadth and height My soul can reach Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love thee to the depth and breadth and height My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight For the ends of being and ideal grace. I love thee to the level of every day's Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. I love thee freely, as men strive for right. I love thee purely, as they turn from praise. I love thee with the passion put to use In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith. I love thee with a love I seemed to lose With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath, Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose, I shall but love thee better after death. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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I love you not only for what you are, but for what I am when I am with you. I love you not only for what you have made of yourself, but for what you are making of me. I love you for the part of me that you bring out. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
I love you not only for what you are, but...
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I love you not only for what you are, but for what I am when I am with you Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Love me sweet With all thou art Feeling, thinking, seeing;...
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Love me sweet With all thou art Feeling, thinking, seeing; Love me in the Lightest part, Love me in full Being. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Earth's crammed with heaven... But only he who sees, takes...
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Earth's crammed with heaven... But only he who sees, takes off his shoes. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
No man can be called friendless who has God and...
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No man can be called friendless who has God and the companionship of good books. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Earth's crammed with heaven, And every common bush afire with...
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Earth's crammed with heaven, And every common bush afire with God. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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Enough! we're tired, my heart and I.We sit beside the headstone thus, And wish that name were carved for us. The moss reprints more tenderly The hard types of the mason's knife, As Heaven's sweet life renews earth's life With which we're tired, my heart and I ..In this abundant earth no doubt Is little room for things worn out: Disdain them, break them, throw them by! And if before the days grew rough We once were loved, used, - well enough, I think, we've fared, my heart and I. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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Books, books, books! I had found the secret of a garret room Piled high with cases in my father’s name; Piled high, packed large, --where, creeping in and out Among the giant fossils of my past, Like some small nimble mouse between the ribs Of a mastodon, I nibbled here and there At this or that box, pulling through the gap, In heats of terror, haste, victorious joy, The first book first. And how I felt it beat Under my pillow, in the morning’s dark, An hour before the sun would let me read! My books! . Elizabeth Barrett Browning
God's gifts put men's best dreams to shame.
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God's gifts put men's best dreams to shame. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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My letters! all dead paper, mute and white! And yet they seem alive and quivering Against my tremulous hands which loose the string And let them drop down on my knee to-night. This said, -- he wished to have me in his sight Once, as a friend: this fixed a day in spring To come and touch my hand. . a simple thing, Yet I wept for it! -- this,. . the paper's light. .Said, Dear I love thee; and I sank and quailed As if God's future thundered on my past. This said, I am thine -- and so its ink has paled With lying at my heart that beat too fast. And this. . O Love, thy words have ill availed If, what this said, I dared repeat at last!. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
My patience has dreadful chilblains from standing so long on...
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My patience has dreadful chilblains from standing so long on a monument. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Our Euripides the human, With his droppings of warm tears,...
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Our Euripides the human, With his droppings of warm tears, and his touchings of things common Till they rose to meet the spheres. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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Better far Pursue a frivolous trade by serious means, Than a sublime art frivolously. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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I am one who could have forgotten the plague, listening to Boccaccio's stories; and I am not ashamed of it. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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We get no good by being ungenerous, even to a book, and calculating profits...so much help by so much reading. it is rather when we gloriously forget ourselves, and plunge soul-forward, headlong, into a book's profound, impassioned for its beauty and salt of truth--'tis then we get the right good from the book. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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Good aims not always make good books. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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It is rather when We gloriously forget ourselves, and plunge Soul-forward, headlong, into a book's profound, Impassioned for its beauty and salt of truth--' Tis then we get the right good from a book. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
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In this abundant earth no doubt Is little room for things worn out: Disdain them, break them, throw them by! And if before the days grew rough We once were lov'd, us'd -- well enough, I think, we've far'd, my heart and I. Elizabeth Barrett Browning