100 Observation Quotes And Sayings

True observation is not seen or heard, but it is felt. To be an observer, we must learn to recognize the parts of life that we can't control and remain calm and centered in our lives. This will allow us to observe and experience the things we cannot change and gives us a deep appreciation for all that we can change.

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It's funny how, in this journey of life, even though we may begin at different times and places, our paths cross with others so that we may share our love, compassion, observations, and hope. This is a design of God that I appreciate and cherish. Steve Maraboli
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Seven years, Dawn. Working with the Slayer. Seeing my friends get more and more powerful.. a witch. A demon. Hell, I could fit Oz in my shaving kit, but come a full moon, he had a wolfy mojo not to be messed with. Powerful, all of them. And I'm the guy who fixes the windows. They'll never know how tough it is, Dawnie, to be the one who isn't Chosen, to live so near the spotlight and never step in it. But I know. I see more than anybody realizes because nobody's watching me. I saw you last night, and I see you working here today. You're not special; you're extraordinary. . Joss Whedon
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Each religion makes scores of purportedly factual assertions about everything from the creation of the universe to the afterlife. But on what grounds can believers presume to know that these assertions are true? The reasons they give are various, but the ultimate justification for most religious people’s beliefs is a simple one: we believe what we believe because our holy scriptures say so. But how, then, do we know that our holy scriptures are factually accurate? Because the scriptures themselves say so. Theologians specialize in weaving elaborate webs of verbiage to avoid saying anything quite so bluntly, but this gem of circular reasoning really is the epistemological bottom line on which all 'faith' is grounded. In the words of Pope John Paul II: 'By the authority of his absolute transcendence, God who makes himself known is also the source of the credibility of what he reveals.' It goes without saying that this begs the question of whether the texts at issue really were authored or inspired by God, and on what grounds one knows this. 'Faith' is not in fact a rejection of reason, but simply a lazy acceptance of bad reasons. 'Faith' is the pseudo-justification that some people trot out when they want to make claims without the necessary evidence. But of course we never apply these lax standards of evidence to the claims made in the other fellow’s holy scriptures: when it comes to religions other than one’s own, religious people are as rational as everyone else. Only our own religion, whatever it may be, seems to merit some special dispensation from the general standards of evidence. And here, it seems to me, is the crux of the conflict between religion and science. Not the religious rejection of specific scientific theories (be it heliocentrism in the 17th century or evolutionary biology today); over time most religions do find some way to make peace with well-established science. Rather, the scientific worldview and the religious worldview come into conflict over a far more fundamental question: namely, what constitutes evidence. Science relies on publicly reproducible sense experience (that is, experiments and observations) combined with rational reflection on those empirical observations. Religious people acknowledge the validity of that method, but then claim to be in the possession of additional methods for obtaining reliable knowledge of factual matters – methods that go beyond the mere assessment of empirical evidence – such as intuition, revelation, or the reliance on sacred texts. But the trouble is this: What good reason do we have to believe that such methods work, in the sense of steering us systematically (even if not invariably) towards true beliefs rather than towards false ones? At least in the domains where we have been able to test these methods – astronomy, geology and history, for instance – they have not proven terribly reliable. Why should we expect them to work any better when we apply them to problems that are even more difficult, such as the fundamental nature of the universe? Last but not least, these non-empirical methods suffer from an insuperable logical problem: What should we do when different people’s intuitions or revelations conflict? How can we know which of the many purportedly sacred texts – whose assertions frequently contradict one another – are in fact sacred?. Alan Sokal
What is important is not what you hear said, it's...
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What is important is not what you hear said, it's what you observe. Michael Connelly
There is no such thing as magic, supernatural, miracle; only...
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There is no such thing as magic, supernatural, miracle; only something that's still beyond logic of the observer. Toba Beta
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He recognized it and knew it. In others–clients, witnesses, or sometimes adversaries, he had seen or heard it: A gesture, a phrase, or a tone which exposed unintended truth in the beat of a second. Jackson Burnett
To acquire knowledge, one must study;but to acquire wisdom, one...
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To acquire knowledge, one must study;but to acquire wisdom, one must observe. Marilyn Vos Savant
What do we any of us have but our illusions?...
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What do we any of us have but our illusions? And what do we ask of others but that we be allowed to keep them? W. Somerset Maugham
We are living in the Selfie Society of Me.
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We are living in the Selfie Society of Me. Ken Poirot
Enchantment lies in everyday moments if you are observant.
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Enchantment lies in everyday moments if you are observant. Amy Leigh Mercree
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Reason, Observation and Experience – the Holy Trinity of Science – have taught us that happiness is the only good; that the time to be happy is now, and the way to be happy is to make others so. This is enough for us. In this belief we are content to live and die. If by any possibility the existence of a power superior to, and independent of, nature shall be demonstrated, there will then be time enough to kneel. Until then, let us stand erect. Robert G. Ingersoll
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Have you noticed how nobody ever looks up? Nobody looks at chimneys, or trees against the sky, or the tops of buildings. Everybody just looks down at the pavement or their shoes. The whole world could pass them by and most people wouldn't notice. Julie Andrews Edwards
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If, years later, I do use the slit detector to observe which way the electron went, it will mean that many years earlier the electron must have passed through one slit or the other. But if I don't use the "slit detector, " then the electron must have passed through both slits. This is, of course, extremely weird. My actions at the beginning of the twenty-first century can change what happened thousands of years ago when the electron began its journey. It seems that just as there are multiple futures, there are also multiple pasts, and my acts of observation in the present can decide what happened in the past. As much as it challenges any hope of ever really knowing the future, quantum physics asks whether I can ever really know the past. It seems that the past is also in a superposition of possibilities that crystallize only once they are observed. . Marcus Du Sautoy
You don't observe your abilities, people do!
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You don't observe your abilities, people do! Vikash Shrivastava
The key to wisdom is silent observation and reflection.
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The key to wisdom is silent observation and reflection. Debasish Mridha
In pale moonlight / the wisteria's scent / comes from...
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In pale moonlight / the wisteria's scent / comes from far away. Yosa Buson
A good writer possesses not only his own spirit but...
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A good writer possesses not only his own spirit but also the spirit of his friends. Friedrich Nietzsche
A writer, I think, is someone who pays attention to...
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A writer, I think, is someone who pays attention to the world.", Frankfurt Book Fair, October 12, 2003] Susan Sontag
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(An unhappy childhood was not) an unsuitable preparation for my future, in that it demanded a constant wariness, the habit of observation, and the attendance on moods and tempers; the noting of discrepancies between speech and action; a certain reserve of demeanour; and automatic suspicion of sudden favours. Rudyard Kipling
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Do stuff. be clenched, curious. Not waiting for inspiration's shove or society's kiss on your forehead. Pay attention. It's all about paying attention. attention is vitality. It connects you with others. It makes you eager. stay eager. Susan Sontag
The stars up close to the moon were pale they...
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The stars up close to the moon were pale they got brighter and braver the farther they got out of the circle of light ruled by the giant moon Ken Kesey
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The whole concatenation of wild and artificial things, the natural ecosystem as modified by people over the centuries, the build environment layered over layers, the eerie mix of sounds and smells and glimpses neither natural nor crafted- all of it is free for the taking, for the taking in. Take it, take it in, take in more every weekend, every day, and quickly it becomes the theater that intrigues, relaxes, fascinates, seduces, and above all expands any mind focused on it. Outside lies utterly ordinary space open to any casual explorer willing to find the extraordinary. Outside lies unprogrammed awareness that at times becomes directed serendipity. Outside lies magic. John R. Stilgoe
The visible emerged from the invisible.
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The visible emerged from the invisible. Lailah Gifty Akita
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From the dawn of exact knowledge to the present day, observation, experiment, and speculation have gone hand in hand; and, whenever science has halted or strayed from the right path, it has been, either because its votaries have been content with mere unverified or unverifiable speculation (and this is the commonest case, because observation and experiment are hard work, while speculation is amusing); or it has been, because the accumulation of details of observation has for a time excluded speculation. Thomas Henry Huxley
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Thus, by science I mean, first of all, a worldview giving primacy to reason and observation and a methodology aimed at acquiring accurate knowledge of the natural and social world. This methodology is characterized, above all else, by the critical spirit: namely, the commitment to the incessant testing of assertions through observations and/or experiments – the more stringent the tests, the better – and to revising or discarding those theories that fail the test. One corollary of the critical spirit is fallibilism: namely, the understanding that all our empirical knowledge is tentative, incomplete and open to revision in the light of new evidence or cogent new arguments (though, of course, the most well-established aspects of scientific knowledge are unlikely to be discarded entirely).. I stress that my use of the term 'science' is not limited to the natural sciences, but includes investigations aimed at acquiring accurate knowledge of factual matters relating to any aspect of the world by using rational empirical methods analogous to those employed in the natural sciences. (Please note the limitation to questions of fact. I intentionally exclude from my purview questions of ethics, aesthetics, ultimate purpose, and so forth.) Thus, 'science' (as I use the term) is routinely practiced not only by physicists, chemists and biologists, but also by historians, detectives, plumbers and indeed all human beings in (some aspects of) our daily lives. (Of course, the fact that we all practice science from time to time does not mean that we all practice it equally well, or that we practice it equally well in all areas of our lives.) . Alan Sokal
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If you want to really know something you have to observe or experience it in person; if you claim to know something on the basis of hearsay, or on happening to see it in a book, you'll be a laughingstock to those who really know. Jonathan D. Spence
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Education being a change of behavior as a result of experience brings about wisdom and knowledge. While knowledge comes from what we read or study, wisdom comes from what we observe and experience. The purpose of education is not to affect negatively but to positively affect. When I see people using whatever wisdom or knowledge they have to cheat, I see an abuse of education all borne out of ignorance. . OMOSOHWOFA CASEY
He never reckoned much to schooling and that. He said...
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He never reckoned much to schooling and that. He said you could learn most what was worth knowing from keeping your eyes and ears peeled. Best way of learning, he always said, was doing. Michael Morpurgo
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I don't know which is worse–to have a bad teacher or no teacher at all. In any case, I believe the teacher's work should be largely negative. He can't put the gift into you, but if he finds it there, he can try to keep it from going in an obviously wrong direction. We can learn how not to write, but this is a discipline that does not simply concern writing itself but concerns the whole intellectual life. A mind cleared of false emotion and false sentiment and egocentricity is going to have at least those roadblocks removed from its path. If you don't think cheaply, then there at least won't be the quality of cheapness in your writing, even though you may not be able to write well. The teacher can try to weed out what is positively bad, and this should be the aim of the whole college. Any discipline can help your writing: logic, mathematics, theology, and of course and particularly drawing. Anything that helps you to see, anything that makes you look. The writer should never be ashamed of staring. There is nothing that doesn't require his attention. Flannery OConnor
Introspection and observation of others are vital for the ongoing...
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Introspection and observation of others are vital for the ongoing good health of our own psyche; watch, learn and tweak as required. Sam Owen
You can only see God when you notice people
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You can only see God when you notice people Sunday Adelaja
For you to be effective in your promised land, you...
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For you to be effective in your promised land, you must study the land Sunday Adelaja
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I believe in evidence. I believe in observation, measurement, and reasoning, confirmed by independent observers. I'll believe anything, no matter how wild and ridiculous, if there is evidence for it. The wilder and more ridiculous something is, however, the firmer and more solid the evidence will have to be. Isaac Asimov
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Science proceeds by inference, rather than by the deduction of mathematical proof. A series of observations is accumulated, forcing the deeper question: What must be true if we are to explain what is observed? What "big picture" of reality offers the best fit to what is actually observed in our experience? American scientist and philosopher Charles S. Peirce used the term "abduction" to refer to the way in which scientists generate theories that might offer the best explanation of things. The method is now more often referred to as "inference to the best explanation." It is now widely agreed to be the philosophy of investigation of the world characteristic of the natural sciences. . Alister E. McGrath
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The house is seventies modern with sliding windows, gas-effect and a giant TV in the living room. There are almost no books. I'm not making any judgement. It's just the sort of thing I can't help but notice. Anthony Horowitz
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Rating a book don't judge the book. It all depends upon the observation of the reader and how much he/she is free to be what he/she is in reality. Perceptions and observations will change according to what you have within and so the learning and the conclusion. The same thought you heard an year before and your conclusion in that regards may be different but after some time the same thought but totally new conclusion.. How really important we are- Surprised! ! Blessed! . AS
One of the fears of having too much work is...
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One of the fears of having too much work is not having time to observe. And once you get recognised, there is nowhere for you to look any more. You can't sit on a night bus and watch it all happen. Benedict Cumberbatch
We do not need to attend classroom training programmes for...
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We do not need to attend classroom training programmes for everything. Observation opens the windows of knowledge around us Sukant Ratnakar
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I think that my job is to observe people and the world, and not to judge them. I always hope to position myself away from so-called conclusions. I would like to leave everything wide open to all the possibilities in the world. Haruki Murakami
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However gross a man may be, the minute he expresses a strong and genuine affection, some inner secretion alters his features, animates his gestures, and colors his voice. The stupidest man will often, under the stress of passion, achieve heights of eloquence, in thought if not in language, and seem to move in some luminous sphere. Goriot's voice and gesture had at this moment the power of communication that characterizes the great actor. Are not our finer feelings the poems of the human will?. Unknown
I like to prowl ordinary placesand taste the people-from a...
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I like to prowl ordinary placesand taste the people-from a distance. Charles Bukowski
There seem to be two main types of people in...
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There seem to be two main types of people in the world, crosswords and sudokus. Rebecca McKinsey
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Funny how nobody talks on the tubes, isn't it? I rarely catch the tube myself, or lifts. Confined spaces, everybody shuts down. Why is that? Perhaps we think everybody on the tube is a potential psychopath or a drunk, so we close down and pretend to read a book or something. John Hannah
People are like the waves, all similar, none the same
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People are like the waves, all similar, none the same Benny Bellamacina
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The club is too loud to talk, so after a couple of drinks, everyone feels like the centre of attention but completely cut off from participating with anyone else. You're the corpse in an English murder mystery. Chuck Palahniuk
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In the bazaar today I noticed a shopkeeper sitting cross-legged on the platform of his shop making up his ledger. A common sight - but there was something wrong, I could not at first see what. Then I understood: what was his heavy ledge resting on? It was lying open before him, on his stomach, but unsupported by his free hand, not resting against his knees. What on earth was propping it up? The problem teased my mind so much that I had to retrace my steps for another look. There he was, comfortably scribbling away in the large ledger, which was standing up, apparently unsupported, in his lap. Then, as I stared, he closed it, and got to his feet - and the mystery was explained. He had elephantiasis of the scrotum, and had been utilising this huge football of tissue as a book-rest. . J.R. Ackerley
Never worry if you’re excluded from the circle, sometimes it’s...
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Never worry if you’re excluded from the circle, sometimes it’s full of squares. Benny Bellamacina
Everyone’s face is odd, because we only get one.
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Everyone’s face is odd, because we only get one. Benny Bellamacina
To observe life as an inevitability and to observe the...
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To observe life as an inevitability and to observe the nuanced stratification of life are two completely different points of view on life. Eraldo Banovac
Beauty is everywhere you look, but you have to look.
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Beauty is everywhere you look, but you have to look. Marty Rubin
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Observation is a dying art. Stanley Kubrick
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But if one observes, one will see that the body has its own intelligence; it requires a great deal of intelligence to observe the intelligence of the body. Jiddu Krishnamurti
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Gifted people of discernment, intelligence, and talent flourish in virtually every occupation. Every field produces perceptive and prescient persons whom exhibit the rare capacity to observe what eludes most people. Kilroy J. Oldster
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In a sort of ghastly simplicity we remove the organ and demand the function. We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honour and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful. C.s. Lewis
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Men are fickle creatures, capable of kindness and compassion yet fascinated by the basest atrocities. Brian Rathbone
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Look around you... Feel the wind, smell the air. Listen to the birds and watch the sky. Tell me what's happening in the wide world. Nancy Farmer
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Drawing makes you look at the world more closely. It helps you to see what you're looking at more clearly. Did you know that?" I said nothing." What colour's a blackbird?" she said." Black"" Typical! David Almond
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We have yet to encounter an observable astronomical phenomenon that require a supernatural element to be added to a model in order to describe the even... Observations in cosmology look just as they can be expected to look if there is no God. Victor J. Stenger
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Children observe everything in nature. Lailah Gifty Akita
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Every eye makes its own perception. Lailah Gifty Akita
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The star rises from the east. Watch out! Lailah Gifty Akita
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Every traveler should make their own observation. Lailah Gifty Akita
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Don't look so far, when it is so near. Lailah Gifty Akita
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If you observe nature daily, it brings harmony with you and God. Lailah Gifty Akita
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We are not what we do! Ramana Pemmaraju
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Nothing has such power to broaden the mind as the ability to investigate systematically and truly all that comes under thy observation in life. Marcus Aurelius
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Only use the mind for practical ways in life. Use your deep inner body energy, observation and breath to glide through life. Matthew Donnelly
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The power of attention is much greater than the force of self-restraint. Charles Eisenstein
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Every traveler has their unique observation of the place they have been. Lailah Gifty Akita
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Falling into true love, is not taking a rope to climb out Benny Bellamacina
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Open your eyes! And observe the miracles of everyday life. Absolute Amazing! Lailah Gifty Akita
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To resolve the discrepancy between waves of probability and our commonsense notion of existence, Bohr and Heisenberg assumed that after a measurement is made by an outside observer, the wave function magically “collapses, ” and the electron falls into a definitestate–that is, after looking at the tree, we see that it is truly standing. In other words, the process of observation determines the final state of the electron. Observation is vital to existence. Michio Kaku
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Before an observation is made, an object exists in all possible states simultaneously. To determine which state the object is in, we have to make an observation, which “collapses” the wave function, and the object goes into a definite state. The act of observation destroys the wave function, and the object now assumesa definite reality. Michio Kaku
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Quiet people always know more than they seem. Although very normal, their inner world is by default fronted mysterious and therefore assumed weird. Never underestimate the social awareness and sense of reality in a quiet person; they are some of the most observant, absorbent persons of all. Criss Jami
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Last night I thought about all that kerosene I've used in the past ten years. And I thought about books. And for the first time I realized that a man was behind each one of the books. A man had to think them up. A man had to take a long time to put them down on paper. And I'd never even thought that thought before." He got out of bed." It took some man a lifetime maybe to put some of his thoughts down, looking around at the world and life and then I come along in two minutes and boom! it's all over."" Let me alone, " said Mildred. "I didn't do anyt. Ray Bradbury
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Every new day, we must refocus, to see the beauty of the moment Lailah Gifty Akita
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We forget that the sweetest joys are found in the simplest acts: hugs, laughter, quiet observation, basic movements, holding hands, pleasant music, shared stories, a listening ear, an unhurried visit, and selfless service. It is sad we forget a truth so elementary. Richelle E. Goodrich
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We must not only observe but listen to the sound of nature. Lailah Gifty Akita
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The world was beautiful when looked at in this way–without any seeking, so simple, so childlike. Hermann Hesse
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If I keep observing the uranium, which means a little more than keeping my eyes on the pot on my desk and involves something akin to surrounding it with a whole system of Geiger counters, I can freeze it in such a way that it stops emitting radiation. Although Turing first suggested the idea as a theoretical construct, it turns out that it is not just mathematical fiction. Experiments in the last decade have demonstrated the real possibility of using observation to inhibit the progress of a quantum system. Marcus Du Sautoy
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The fiction writer is an observer, first, last, and always, but he cannot be an adequate observer unless he is free from uncertainty about what he sees. Those who have no absolute values cannot let the relative remain merely relative; they are always raising it to the level of the absolute. The Catholic fiction writer is entirely free to observe. He feels no call to take on the duties of God or to create a new universe. He feels perfectly free to look at the one we already have and to show exactly what he sees. Flannery OConnor
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Cause and effect is the basis of my education, leading me to an essence far more profound than any rule of societal conditioning. Ka Chinery
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Often we don't notice the stringent rules to which our culture subjects us. Sara Sheridan
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We all feel that the opposite of our own highest principle must be purely destructive, deadly, and evil. We refuse to endow it with any positive life-force; hence we avoid and fear it. C.g. Jung
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Everywhere I go, it's me and me. Half of me living my life, the other half watching me live it. Sandra Cisneros
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My life is for itself and not for a spectacle. Ralph Waldo Emerson
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I spend more time with the living, than the dead now. Jennifer Hotes
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Mindfulness is observing and asking why. Millions saw the apple fall but Newton asked why. Amit Ray
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A genius masters the art of observation, and unites with the source of imagination to create advancements in the cause for human evolution. T.F. Hodge
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In the example of the navigator, no writing was essential to draw the meaning of observing the object at a distance from the ship. In the real theobservation has been noted and that is enough to give it a meaning, a subjective meaning, a meaning exclusively important for the navigator himself. Anuradha Bhattacharyya
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Most of the things we deem as impossible are only impossible because we’ve given them permission to be impossible. Craig D. Lounsbrough
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Beyond the visible is invisible. Lailah Gifty Akita
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For all his secrecy and fear of being seen, he was touched that we had observed him so closely, and with such love. He loved that we knew him. This is one reason people need to believe in God -- because we want someone to know us, truly, all the way through, even the worst of us. Tim Kreider
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If you've got a religious belief that withers in the face of observations of the natural world, you ought to rethink your beliefs - rethinking the world isn't an option. P.Z. Myers
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What we have now, shall never be again. The poets of the past sit in amazement of the wanna-be's of an era long gone. T. Grassan
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People who are out of control desperately need to observe your healthy boundaries in-play to learn from your example. Bryant McGill
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By means of personal experimentation and observation, we can discover certain simple and universal truths. The mind moves the body, and the body follows the mind. Logically then, negative thought patterns harm not only the mind but also the body. What we actually do builds up to affect the subconscious mind and in turn affects the conscious mind and all reactions. H.E. Davey
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Mindfulness & Meditation help focus on the moment while at the same time knowing we cannot capture that moment, we are in a flow of moments we let flow. We can watch moments in detail without being attached to them. Non-attachment to past & future stems from this practice. Worry about past or future is wasted energy, however we can observe the past & learn from it without agonising over it & trust ourselves to handle the future better. We can celebrate the opportunity to grow as we gain understanding from observation & experience. We can watch ourselves & avoid being caught up in over-reactions. "I am loved, right now, in this moment, I love, and am part of love itself. I am aware of myself at every level - the mental slowing gracefully to sense the spiritual within & all around, and the physical being still, or moving. I tune in to the flow of life in my body & the flow of life everywhere. I circulate love with each breath - from without to within & from within to all around. . Jay Woodman
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Meditation is one of the most serious things; you do it all day, in the office, with the family, when you say to somebody "I love you", when you are considering your children, when you educate them to become soldiers, to kill, to be nationalized, worshipping the flag, educating them to enter into this trap of the modern world; watching all that, realizing your part in it, all that is part of meditation. And when you so meditate you will find in it an extraordinary beauty; you will act rightly at every moment; and if you do not act rightly at a given moment it does not matter, you will pick it up again - you will not waste time in regret. Meditation is part of life, not something different from life. Jiddu Krishnamurti
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Prose Poems from my book SPANOBSERVATIONSo, we may not be able to explain the world. Not exactly. But we can accept it, and love it. We can turn our faces to the light and examine the minutest details simply for the sake of it. We can live lives of joy and purpose. We are all part of one whole. Take comfort in this. Almost every one of us is capable of holding a cup to another’s lips without our hands shaking. Jay Woodman