60 Best Intellect Quotes And Sayings

The human cerebrum is called the mind because it is a seat of thought. The mind is a physical organ, but it operates in a mental space, a form of consciousness which is different from both the physical and the spiritual. This being so, certain mental faculties predominate in man over others. The highest mental faculty of man is that of intellect, which he shares with animals Read more

This faculty can be compared to brain power, but it has far greater significance than mere brute strength. In the realm of intellect, man differs from the other kingdoms of nature; he has made more progress toward perfection than they, and his mental nature is less limited and less crude.

Watch out for intellect, because it knows so much it...
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Watch out for intellect, because it knows so much it knows nothingand leaves you hanging upside down, mouthing knowledge as your heartfalls out of your mouth. Anne Sexton
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How very paltry and limited the normal human intellect is, and how little lucidity there is in the human consciousness, may be judged from the fact that, despite the ephemeral brevity of human life, the uncertainty of our existence and the countless enigmas which press upon us from all sides, everyone does not continually and ceaselessly philosophize, but that only the rarest of exceptions do. Arthur Schopenhauer
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Ideas are the source of all things Plato
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The intellectual attainments of a man who thinks for himself resemble a fine painting, where the light and shade are correct, the tone sustained, the colour perfectly harmonised; it is true to life. On the other hand, the intellectual attainments of the mere man of learning are like a large palette, full of all sorts of colours, which at most are systematically arranged, but devoid of harmony, connection and meaning. Arthur Schopenhauer
I offer no apologies to those whom I may have...
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I offer no apologies to those whom I may have rendered uncomfortable with my open and honest assertions. The truth is often harsh and uncomfortable to embrace. Unknown
Burn worldly love, rub the ashes and make ink of...
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Burn worldly love, rub the ashes and make ink of it, make the heart the pen, the intellect the writer, write that which has no end or limit. Guru Nanak
The foundation of wisdom is knowing how to tell when...
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The foundation of wisdom is knowing how to tell when you are totally clueless, lost, and in need of assistance. A.E. Samaan
The acquisition of knowledge is always of use to the...
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The acquisition of knowledge is always of use to the intellect, because it may thus drive out useless things and retain the good. For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known. Leonardo Da Vinci
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Failure to find the truth is perhaps an intellectual defeat, but failure to look for the truth is an intellectual surrender. Unknown
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All the activities that are happening in this world are indeed done through the intellect; there is no need for Knowledge there. Knowledge is indeed in Knowledge (Knowing). And whatever actions are done through the intellect, the Knowledge ‘Knows’ it too. Dada Bhagwan
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Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature, and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquito's wing that falls on the rails. Let us rise early and fast, or break fast, gently and without perturbation; let company come and let company go, let the bells ring and the children cry, -- determined to make a day of it. Why should we knock under and go with the stream? Let us not be upset and overwhelmed in that terrible rapid and whirlpool called a dinner, situated in the meridian shallows. Weather this danger and you are safe, for the rest of the way is down hill. With unrelaxed nerves, with morning vigor, sail by it, looking another way, tied to the mast like Ulysses. If the engine whistles, let it whistle till it is hoarse for its pains. If the bell rings, why should we run? We will consider what kind of music they are like. Let us settle ourselves, and work and wedge our feet downward through the mud and slush of opinion, and prejudice, and tradition, and delusion, and appearance, that alluvion which covers the globe, through Paris and London, through New York and Boston and Concord, through church and state, through poetry and philosophy and religion, till we come to a hard bottom and rocks in place, which we can call reality, and say, This is, and no mistake; and then begin, having a point d'appui, below freshet and frost and fire, a place where you might found a wall or a state, or set a lamp-post safely, or perhaps a gauge, not a Nilometer, but a Realometer, that future ages might know how deep a freshet of shams and appearances had gathered from time to time. If you stand right fronting and face to face to a fact, you will see the sun glimmer on both its surfaces, as if it were a cimeter, and feel its sweet edge dividing you through the heart and marrow, and so you will happily conclude your mortal career. Be it life or death, we crave only reality. If we are really dying, let us hear the rattle in our throats and feel cold in the extremities; if we are alive, let us go about our business. Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in. I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom and detect how shallow it is. Its thin current slides away, but eternity remains. I would drink deeper; fish in the sky, whose bottom is pebbly with stars. I cannot count one. I know not the first letter of the alphabet. I have always been regretting that I was not as wise as the day I was born. The intellect is a cleaver; it discerns and rifts its way into the secret of things. I do not wish to be any more busy with my hands than is necessary. My head is hands and feet. I feel all my best faculties concentrated in it. My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore-paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills. I think that the richest vein is somewhere hereabouts; so by the divining rod and thin rising vapors I judge; and here I will begin to mine. Henry David Thoreau
I'm a pessimist because of intelligence, but an optimist because...
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I'm a pessimist because of intelligence, but an optimist because of will. Antonio Gramsci
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To have contrary [negative, wrong] intellect has become an odd rule in this current era, hasn’t it? The one who proceeds with caution will win. Dada Bhagwan
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The [true] intellectual is he who does not let harm done to others and nor let any harm done to even one's own self. Dada Bhagwan
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Muscle is good, but craft is better Wace
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Sexual thrills are not all physical, and although Parlabane was an unlikely seducer, even on the intellectual plane, it was clear that his desire was, by this prolonged tickling, to bring me to an orgasm of the mind. Robertson Davies
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Man's mind may be likened to a garden, which may be intelligently cultivated or allowed to run wild. James Allen
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No matter what it is, if you don’t move your eyes and set the pace yourself, your intellect is sentenced to death. The mind, you see, is like a muscle. For it to remain agile and strong, it must work. Television rules that out. Mark Helprin
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Our intellect holds the same position in the world of thought as our body occupies in the expanse of nature. Blaise Pascal
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One must have a good memory to be able to keep the promises one has given. One must have strong powers of imagination to be able to have pity. So closely is morality bound to the quality of the intellect. Friedrich Nietzsche