Quotes From "Pride And Prejudice" By Jane Austen

A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration...
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A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment. Jane Austen
In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My...
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In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you. Jane Austen
I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or...
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I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun. Jane Austen
Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.
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Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection. Jane Austen
She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me,...
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She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. Jane Austen
Had I been in love, I could not have been...
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Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. Jane Austen
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They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance, that it was impossible to avoid his sight. Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest blush. He absolutely started, and for a moment seemed immoveable from surprise; but shortly recovering himself, advanced towards the party, and spoke to Elizabeth, if not in terms of perfect composure, at least of perfect civility. Jane Austen
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You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner." (Elizabeth Bennett) Jane Austen
Elizabeth's spirit's soon rising to playfulness again, she wanted Mr....
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Elizabeth's spirit's soon rising to playfulness again, she wanted Mr. Darcy to account for his having ever fallen in love with her. 'How could you begin?' said she. begun. Jane Austen
Is not general incivility the very essence of love?
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Is not general incivility the very essence of love? Jane Austen
Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is...
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Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain. Jane Austen
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Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life. Jane Austen
And to all this she must yet add something more...
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And to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading. Jane Austen
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It is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are they the result of previous study? Jane Austen
Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride - where...
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Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride - where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation. Jane Austen
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My good qualities are under your protection, and you are to exaggerate them as much as possible; and, in return, it belongs to me to find occasion for teasing and quarreling with you as often as may be... Jane Austen
Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and,...
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Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required. Jane Austen
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But to live in ignorance on such a point was impossible. Jane Austen
Words were insufficient for the elevation of his [Mr Collins']...
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Words were insufficient for the elevation of his [Mr Collins'] feelings; and he was obliged to walk about the room, while Elizabeth tried to unite civility and truth in a few short sentences. Jane Austen
Angry people are not always wise.
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Angry people are not always wise. Jane Austen