Quotes From "Emma" By Jane Austen

One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of...
1
One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other. Jane Austen
Without music, life would be a blank to me.
2
Without music, life would be a blank to me. Jane Austen
There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always...
3
There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always do if he chooses, and that is his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution. - Mr. Knightley Jane Austen
Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human...
4
Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken. Jane Austen
5
It has sunk him, I cannot say how much it has sunk him in my opinion. So unlike what a man should be! - None of that upright integrity, that strict adherence to truth and principle, that distain of trick and littleness, which a man should display in every transaction of his life. Jane Austen
My Emma, does not every thing serve to prove more...
6
My Emma, does not every thing serve to prove more and more the beauty of truth and sincerity in all our dealings with each other? Jane Austen
You must be the best judge of your own happiness.
7
You must be the best judge of your own happiness. Jane Austen
Why not seize the pleasure at once? -- How often...
8
Why not seize the pleasure at once? -- How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation! Jane Austen
9
She was happy, she knew she was happy, and knew she ought to be happy. Jane Austen
How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!
10
How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation! Jane Austen
Happiness must preclude false indulgence and physic.
11
Happiness must preclude false indulgence and physic. Jane Austen
12
But a sanguine temper, though for ever expecting more good than occurs, does not always pay for its hopes by any proportionate depression. it soon flies over the present failure, and begins to hope again. Jane Austen
She looked back as well as she could; but it...
13
She looked back as well as she could; but it was all confusion. She had taken up the idea, she supposed and made everything bend to it. Jane Austen
Time did not compose her.
14
Time did not compose her. Jane Austen
Time will generally lessen the interest of every attachment not...
15
Time will generally lessen the interest of every attachment not within the daily circle. Jane Austen
Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever...
16
Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever does. Jane Austen
But one never does form a just idea of anybody...
17
But one never does form a just idea of anybody beforehand. One takes up a notion and runs away with it. Jane Austen
18
Emma has been meaning to read more ever since she was twelve years old. I have seen a great many lists of her drawingup at various times of books that she meant to read regularly through–and very good lists they were–very well chosen, and very neatly arranged–sometimes alphabetically, and sometimes by some other rule. The list she drew up when only fourteen– I remember thinking it did her judgment so much credit, that I preserved it some time; and I dare say she may have made out a very good list now. But I have done with expecting any course of steady reading from Emma. She will never submit to any thing requiring industry and patience, and a subjection of the fancy to the understanding. Jane Austen
19
The most incomprehensible thing in the world to a man, is a woman who rejects his offer of marriage! Jane Austen
20
Luck which so often defies anticipation in matrimonial affairs, giving attraction to what is moderate rather than to what is superior. Jane Austen